Bread ingredients – Village Mill Bread http://villagemillbread.com/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 00:53:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://villagemillbread.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg Bread ingredients – Village Mill Bread http://villagemillbread.com/ 32 32 Esther la Zesteuse | Quick appetizers benefit from fresh herbs – Times-Standard https://villagemillbread.com/esther-la-zesteuse-quick-appetizers-benefit-from-fresh-herbs-times-standard/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 00:21:47 +0000 https://villagemillbread.com/esther-la-zesteuse-quick-appetizers-benefit-from-fresh-herbs-times-standard/ With the holidays right on our doorstep, quick and delicious appetizers are an easy way to celebrate with family and friends. During this pandemic, I took up the hobby of growing fresh herbs which makes this recipe very special. Enjoy and live zestier! Cheese bites to go Ingredients: 1 round, crisp loaf of bread (I […]]]>

With the holidays right on our doorstep, quick and delicious appetizers are an easy way to celebrate with family and friends. During this pandemic, I took up the hobby of growing fresh herbs which makes this recipe very special.

Enjoy and live zestier!

Cheese bites to go

Ingredients:

  • 1 round, crisp loaf of bread (I used a small loaf sold as a bread bowl for the soup)
  • 1 cup of grated cheddar cheese
  • 1/2 cup grated mozzarella cheese
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 3 tbsp. olive oil
  • 2 tbsp. unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 tbsp. finely chopped fresh chives
  • 1 C. chopped garlic
  • 1/4 tsp. paprika

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350 F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or foil (this makes cleaning easier.)

When cutting the bread, make squares that can be pulled apart later. (Esther Kennedy / Contributed)

Using a serrated bread knife, slice round bread vertically into 1-inch cubes, being careful not to cut all the way through. Once the bread has been cut from end to end, repeat the operation but horizontally. The round bread will look like a puzzle and have room between the cubes to stuff the cheese mixture. Place sliced ​​bread on the lined baking sheet.

In a small bowl, combine olive oil and 3 teaspoons of parsley; mix gently. Drizzle the mixture between all the bread cubes, trying to cover the entire loaf of bread. If the bread seems too dry, repeat the process.

In another small bowl, combine the cheddar, mozzarella, half the Parmesan, paprika, chives and 2 tablespoons of parsley; stir until combined. Carefully start to “stuff” the bread between the cubes. Stuff as low without separating the cubes.

Combine melted butter, minced garlic and remaining parsley and brush or baste on top of bread. Sprinkle the rest with Parmesan.

Bake for about 13-15 minutes or until cheese is completely melted and top is golden brown. Once out of the oven, transfer to a plate and savor the goodness of the cheese!

The size of the bread will determine the number of servings. A bun is good for two to three people;

Esther Kennedy is a Myrtletown resident and recipe maker. She can be reached by email at estherthezester@gmail.com or on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/estherthezester.


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The Five New SF Ferry Building Food Businesses You Must Try https://villagemillbread.com/the-five-new-sf-ferry-building-food-businesses-you-must-try/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 14:45:23 +0000 https://villagemillbread.com/the-five-new-sf-ferry-building-food-businesses-you-must-try/ Every now and then Elliot Sharifi of Obur Foods, one of the newer food companies in San Francisco’s famous Ferry Building Marketplace, looks around his new digs and feels a bit like an impostor. “If you had told me four years ago that this hummus business that I started on a whim was going to […]]]>

Every now and then Elliot Sharifi of Obur Foods, one of the newer food companies in San Francisco’s famous Ferry Building Marketplace, looks around his new digs and feels a bit like an impostor.

“If you had told me four years ago that this hummus business that I started on a whim was going to thrive, that I would open a place in the Ferry Building and have customers every week. , I would have laughed, ”says Sharifi, who started selling her gourmet dips and spreads last month at the kiosk across from Acme Bread Company.

Considering the visibility and the culinary companionship, landing a seat inside this multi-story room is like hitting the big bang. But as the pandemic has proven, it’s not always the lottery ticket of small business dreams. Five companies – including Cowgirl Creamery, one of the building’s last original tenants – have left since 2020 for various reasons, some related to the pandemic.

In its quest to fill these niches, “to promote the vast ethnic diversity of the Bay Area and serve as an incubator for artisanal producers,” as its mission statement indicates, management has picked up a mix of young businesses. and established, seven in total.

Sharifi, who is Persian, has joined sustainable caviar producer Tsai Nicoulai and Latin American restaurant Cholita Linda on the Embarcadero. Two more businesses will follow in the coming weeks: Grande Crêperie, a French crêperie owned by the family behind Le Marais bakery in San Francisco, and Yes Pudding, a four-year-old dessert company known for its bread puddings and seasonal cobblers. . All five are immigrants or belong to BIPOC.

“My dreams weren’t big enough because I could never have imagined that,” Yes Pudding founder Quanisha Johnson said in a Nov. 29 post on Instagram. “I’ve always wanted Yes Pudding to be a San Francisco staple, and what better place to make it come true than inside one of San Francisco’s most iconic landmarks!”

The local aspect and the high quality of the products are what unites these companies, says Jane Connor, General Manager of the Ferry Building. Connor, who has worked at the Ferry Building since 2003, says it typically takes one to two years to secure a space, usually while waiting for a vendor to retire.

“Many of these (new) businesses may have thought that opening a store in an iconic market was out of reach at this stage or at this size, but we’re excited to support local businesses during a pivotal time in their growth. “said Connor.

Marai Bolourchi with Tsar Nicoulai Caviar Cafe poses for a photo inside the Ferry Building in San Francisco. (Anda Chu / Bay Area News Group)

The length of the lease and the type of space depend on the company. A small kiosk, like Sharifi’s, is a good way for a new food entrepreneur to open their first brick and mortar location and incubate their retail concept. Some kiosk companies start with a shorter lease – 12 to 18 months, for example – but end up staying longer or increasing in size.

This was the case for El Porteño. Ten years ago, owner Joey Ahearne started serving his empanadas at a 50 square foot kiosk. It has since expanded into a space seven times the size in Shop # 20 on the Embarcadero side of the Great Hall. Dandelion Chocolate, which started in 2015 at a 69-square-foot kiosk, now sells its Mission District pastries and candy bars at a 575-square-foot cafe (store # 14).

“These are the kinds of trips we love to see,” says Connor.

Still, the year and the past eight months have been tough for the historic hall, with typical morning commuters and downtown lunches working from home, and tourists taking selfies away from the Embarcadero.

Since 2020, the building has lost five tenants – Brown Sugar Kitchen, MarketBar, Farm Fresh to You and San Francisco Fish Company, as well as Cowgirl Creamery – but gained seven, including high-end honey producer Carmel Honey Company and Oakland’s Red Bay Coffee, the black-owned roaster that took over the Peet’s Coffee space last spring.

Bagel sensation Dogpatch Daily Driver opened its Shop No. 21 space just before the pandemic hit in January 2020. At the time, the bagel company was less than a year old, even younger than Obour Foods.

Obour’s Sharifi left a high-paying job as a financial analyst in 2017 to focus on gourmet hummus and tahini spreads. They would be the best ever, he told himself and his stunned immigrant parents the first time he soaked and sprouted chickpeas, crushed his own organic sesame seeds and played. with mixtures of spices such as zhoug and berber.

It took her a few months to learn how to start a food business and find a commercial kitchen, and nine months to land her first farmer’s market. All the while, customers kept coming back with empty glass jars, asking for more pomegranate tahini and creamy, spicy Aleppo hummus.

Obour Foods by Elliot Sharifi makes hummus, tahini, and other Persian foods. (Anda Chu / Bay Area News Group)

Sharifi has become meticulous about his methods and ingredients. He rinsed the starch from the beans and used fresh, organic lemon juice squeezed near Oakland. He sought out the popular flavors of world cuisines – for example Israeli zhoug or Ethiopian Berber – and those of his own Persian heritage.

“Date and pomegranate tahini are straight out of my childhood, that mix of sweet and savory that’s so good,” Sharifi says. He has a chocolate tahini coming out next year that he promises will be “healthy Nutella”.

In 2020, Obour Foods was present at a dozen Bay Area Farmers’ Markets. The company now employs 17 people. In February, Sharifi was hanging out at the Ferry Building – happy to be inside again, in a bustling gastronomic environment – when he said that something “kind of clicked.”

“I emailed the rental desk and we started talking,” he says.

The whole process was easier and faster than entering a suburban farmers market. But Sharifi says he always feels like he’s there from the outside looking in: “Considering my history and where I’m from, it’s still nothing that I have. have completely internalized.

Here are more details on the other new restaurants inside the Ferry Building:

Tsar Nicoulai

It’s a big comeback for this pioneering producer of sustainable caviar, who had an outpost in the Ferry Building a decade ago. The caviar bar offers flights of sparkling wines accompanied by a variety of caviars, smoked fish and a tasting menu including charcuterie platters. The caviar served at Tsar Nicoulai comes from his award-winning farm and aquaponics facility in Sacramento; www.tsarnicoulai.com.

Premium caviar service at Tsar Nicoulai Caviar Cafe inside the Ferry Building. (Anda Chu / Bay Area News Group)

Cholita Linda

Founded by Vanessa Chavez and Murat Sozeri in 2008, Cholita Linda started out as a stand at Oakland’s Jack London Square Farmers Market before opening two brick-and-mortar stores in Alameda and the Temescal neighborhood of Oakland. Look for a menu of Mexican and Cuban dishes made with fresh, local ingredients, including Baja fish tacos, Cuban sandwiches, aguas frescas, and handcrafted cocktails; https://cholitalinda.com.


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Makki Ki Roti and more: 5 best flatbread recipes to try this winter https://villagemillbread.com/makki-ki-roti-and-more-5-best-flatbread-recipes-to-try-this-winter/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 03:30:01 +0000 https://villagemillbread.com/makki-ki-roti-and-more-5-best-flatbread-recipes-to-try-this-winter/ Rotis, or flatbreads, are an essential part of any Indian meal. Kneading the dough, rolling the roti perfectly round, then placing it on a tawa or tandoor requires a lot of skill and knowledge. The nicest part about rotis, however, is their versatility. They pair well with a variety of dishes, from simple dal to […]]]>

Rotis, or flatbreads, are an essential part of any Indian meal. Kneading the dough, rolling the roti perfectly round, then placing it on a tawa or tandoor requires a lot of skill and knowledge. The nicest part about rotis, however, is their versatility. They pair well with a variety of dishes, from simple dal to complex curries. You can always give your standard rotis a makeover to add that extra touch to your meals. Especially, in winter, nothing beats the experience of having hot rotis slathered with ghee and served with steaming curries.

Here are 5 delicious flatbread (Roti) recipes you can try this winter:

1) Makki Ki Roti

It’s a wintery delight from northern India, particularly the Punjab, and it’s traditionally served with the appetizing Sarso Ka Saag. This roti is prepared with makki ka attack. Often, cooked with spoonfuls of ghee, it’s rich and flavorful. Don’t forget to enjoy the winters with makki ki roti and sarso ka saag.

(Also read: How To Make Crispy Tandoori Rotis At Home Without A Tandoor)

2) Thalipith

Rotis can be this tasty without ghee, and this Maharashtrian delicacy proves it. It is a multigrain flatbread made from a traditional blend of four flours: wheat flour, bajra, rice flour and besan. It’s hearty and healthy. So what are you waiting for? Do it today and enjoy it.

3) Amritsari Kulcha

If you’re trying to spice up your meals, your search should end here. Winter calls for hearty, packaged kulchas, which can be accompanied by a delicious chhole cooked with a variety of spices. This naan bread recipe filled with a variety of vegetables and spices is a winter staple.

4) Bajra Methi Missi Roti

This recipe gives you a chance to step away from your usual parathas and create something unique and healthy. Bajra and other ingredients used here have a wide range of health benefits. Do this and have a good meal.

(Also Read: What Is Akki Roti, How To Make This Crispy South Indian Rice Flatbread At Home)

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5) Malabari Parotta

Malabari food is a feast for the senses, with a variety of flavors and textures to excite the palate. Malabari cuisine is a gourmet’s dream come true. Treat your family to the delicious Malabari Parotta. Serve it hot with Chicken Chettinad or Kerala Mutton Stew.

Whip up these delicious rotis the next time you want to spice up your desi dinners, and let us know how it goes.


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15 slow cooker breakfasts perfect for chilly mornings https://villagemillbread.com/15-slow-cooker-breakfasts-perfect-for-chilly-mornings/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 20:19:02 +0000 https://villagemillbread.com/15-slow-cooker-breakfasts-perfect-for-chilly-mornings/ Slow cooker breakfasts are the perfect solution when you’re in a hurry. Image Credit: jenifoto / iStock / GettyImages Warm and comforting slow cooker breakfasts can give you the fuel you need to get through those cold mornings. Slow cookers are a classic kitchen appliance that can help you create bundles of tasty dishes when […]]]>

Slow cooker breakfasts are the perfect solution when you’re in a hurry.

Image Credit: jenifoto / iStock / GettyImages

Warm and comforting slow cooker breakfasts can give you the fuel you need to get through those cold mornings.

Slow cookers are a classic kitchen appliance that can help you create bundles of tasty dishes when you are short on time: you prepare your ingredients, add them, and let your food cook slowly and slowly. But the time-saving device can do more than soups and stews – it can make a great breakfast, too.

If you’ve never thought about using the Crock-Pot to make a morning meal, let one (or all) of these delicious slow cooker breakfast recipes inspire you.

1. Slow cooker oatmeal with apple and cranberries

These oatmeal are full of seasonal flavors.

These slow cooker oatmeal with apple and cranberries taste like falling into a bowl with seasonal flavors like apples, fresh cranberries, maple syrup and spices like cinnamon and cardamom.

It’s the perfect batch slow cooker breakfast recipe. You can store leftover oats in the fridge, then add some of your favorite milk or water when you reheat them.

2. Slow Cooker Cherry Almond Oatmeal

You’ll feel like you’re eating cherry pie for breakfast, but with nutritious additions like flax seeds and almond butter.

Start your day with a sweet treat with this Cherry Almond Oatmeal recipe. When you don’t have time to stand in front of the stove stirring the oatmeal in the morning, this recipe is a great choice.

Simply combine healthy ingredients like flax seeds, chia seeds, almond butter, and tart cherries in your slow cooker before bed and wake up to a hot and filling breakfast. You can store leftover oats in mason jars and make your breakfast for the rest of the week!

3. Sweet Potato and Sausage Breakfast Casserole

Sweet potatoes add a little sweetness to this tasty slow cooker breakfast.

Pans aren’t just for the oven – this sweet potato and sausage breakfast casserole can be made in your slow cooker and combines some tasty breakfast staples.

But this version gives you a morning dose of nutrients thanks to the sweet potatoes and other vegetables. In addition, it is rich in protein.

4. Slow Cooker Apple Cinnamon Roll Casserole

Store-bought refrigerated cinnamon rolls help you save time when making this dish.

You can’t go wrong with classic cinnamon rolls, but this Crock-Pot Cinnamon Apple Casserole might have you covered.

There is very little prep through the use of refrigerated cinnamon buns, but the end result is rich in flavor with the addition of chopped apples and egg custard sweetened with maple syrup, vanilla and cinnamon.

5. Slow Cooker Cauliflower Hash Browns Breakfast Casserole

Cauliflower ‘hash browns’ help make this keto-friendly breakfast casserole.

This Cauliflower and Hash Browns Slow Cooker Breakfast Casserole is low in carbs, gluten free and high in protein. A dish that would normally take almost an hour in the oven is pretty ready once you wake up from letting all the ingredients cook overnight.

You’ll wake up to a delicious casserole filled with breakfast favorites like sausage and eggs. You can also customize the casserole dish using bacon, ham, or your favorite plant-based meat substitute.

6. Slow cooker eggnog granola

This slow cooker eggnog granola gives you another reason to have more of your favorite holiday drink.

When eggnog season arrives, this slow cooker eggnog granola makes a festive addition to your favorite yogurt or to a delicious snack. And you can make it with healthy ingredients that you’ve probably already stored in your pantry, like oats, nuts, and flax seeds.

Top these ingredients with hot spices like nutmeg and cinnamon and add your favorite dairy or non-dairy eggnog and let your slow cooker do the rest.

7. Crock-Pot Crockless Spinach and Feta Quiche

This quiche is rindless and contains only three main ingredients.

If making a quiche seems intimidating to you, try this crusted spinach and feta version. It only uses four main ingredients: frozen chopped spinach, feta, eggs, and whatever milk you prefer. And the best part is you can make this recipe over and over again using leftover vegetables and meats like chicken, ham, sausage, or even steak if you want to.

8. Slow Cooker Pumpkin Streusel Cake

You can make gluten-free, egg-free, dairy-free and vegan versions of this pumpkin streusel coffee cake.

Who doesn’t love a good slice of coffee cake? This pumpkin streusel coffee cake is packed with seasonal spices like cinnamon, nutmeg and maple syrup and pairs perfectly with your morning coffee or tea. You can also make this gluten-free recipe using gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free, and vegan oats with a few small substitutions.

9. Crock-Pot Blueberry Breakfast Casserole

This sweet breakfast casserole contains 34 grams of protein.

This recipe is like blueberry pie, only better. Fresh or frozen French bread and blueberries are combined with eggs, hot cinnamon and maple syrup for a delicious breakfast or snack. It is a rich dish but also rich in protein, potassium and fiber.

10. Slow cooker apple and gingerbread crumble

This apple and gingerbread crumble will remind you of tasty holiday desserts.

Fruit and granola are a classic breakfast option and this slow cooker apple and gingerbread crumble gives a seasonal twist to a classic with ingredients like molasses, cinnamon and maple syrup. You’ll feel like you’re eating apple pie every time.

The recipe can also be made gluten-free and vegan using gluten-free oats and vegan butter or coconut oil.

11. Crock-Pot Cookie Breakfast Casserole

You are sure to be satisfied after eating this hearty casserole dish, which contains 17 grams of protein.

This casserole dish brings together all the foods you already love for breakfast: cookies, eggs, cheese and bacon. Enjoy them in a new way by layering them in your slow cooker and cooking them for a few hours. The end result is a hearty breakfast that’s high in protein and full of heartwarming flavors.

12. Slow Cooker Sticky Pecan Buns

These sweet and sticky pecan buns will make you feel like you’re eating dessert for breakfast.

These Slow Cooker Sticky Pecan Buns taste just as decadent as traditional sticky buns and the butterscotch sauce will make you want to have them for breakfast. They can even be made vegan using your favorite non-dairy milk and vegan butter or coconut oil.

Spice up this Crock-Pot Hash with some sliced ​​jalapeño peppers.

Hash is always a great breakfast idea and this Crock-Pot recipe has a creamy coating, with the addition of canned cream of potato.

Meat lovers can add breakfast sausages, ham or bacon (or as many meats as you want). And you can add more veg for extra nutrition or skip the meat if you’re a vegetarian.

14. 5-Ingredient Slow Cooker Granola

Using your slow cooker can help you achieve crispy granola without the extra oil or oats.

Crispy brown rice cereal is the secret ingredient to making this slow cooker five-ingredient granola as crispy as traditional versions. The honey adds a little sweetness and the egg whites give the granola some protein. You can make it vegan by replacing egg whites with non-dairy milk and using maple syrup or agave in place of honey.

15. Crock-Pot Fully Loaded Breakfast Casserole

This loaded breakfast casserole is high in protein and makes a delicious breakfast burrito topping.

This loaded Crock-Pot breakfast casserole is full of staples like potatoes, bacon, cheese, and eggs. The good news is, you can fill the dish with lighter ingredients like turkey bacon, veggies, and egg whites if you want. You can also make this vegetarian dish by eliminating the meat or using a plant-based meat substitute.

Image Credit: LIVESTRONG.com Creative


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Turkish coffee day: eat it and drink it https://villagemillbread.com/turkish-coffee-day-eat-it-and-drink-it/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 09:25:30 +0000 https://villagemillbread.com/turkish-coffee-day-eat-it-and-drink-it/ Turkish coffee is more than just a caffeinated drink to wake you up in the morning. It is steeped in tradition and has evolved into an integral part of Turkish culture over the centuries. For example, it is unthinkable to ask for a woman’s hand without consuming the titular drink. The bride brews and serves […]]]>

Turkish coffee is more than just a caffeinated drink to wake you up in the morning. It is steeped in tradition and has evolved into an integral part of Turkish culture over the centuries. For example, it is unthinkable to ask for a woman’s hand without consuming the titular drink. The bride brews and serves sweet coffee if she approves of the match and a savory variation if she refuses. The tradition has changed over the years and the seated visit to ask for the bride’s hand has become more of a formality. Nowadays, it has become almost obligatory for the bride to serve the salty coffee to test the groom’s resolve to not make a face while drinking it.

Fortune-telling is another important Turkish pastime associated with coffee, and as the saying goes “there’s an app for it”. You can literally upload a photo of your coffee grounds to the app and the fortune teller of your choice predicts your future right on your smartphone.

These are just a few of the many aspects of Turkish coffee culture and UNESCO agrees! In 2013, the titular drink and its associations were inscribed on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

How to make coffee

After this longer-than-expected introduction, let’s take a closer look at the coffee itself. The coffee here is ground finer than it would be for filter coffee. Usually you use a small pot with a long handle called a “cezve” in Turkish to prepare it, but with modern times comes convenience, and now there are even tiny kettle-like machines that make the job even faster.

The coffee can be brewed as sweet as you want or you can add other flavors like mastic gum as well. Speaking of convenience: there are even instant Turkish coffees, where you just add hot water to have a cup. These come in many flavors as well, but as with many instant things – nothing beats the original.

Here is the basic recipe to try:

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of water, about 200 milliliters
  • 1-2 teaspoons of ground coffee
  • Up to 3 teaspoons of sugar, optional

Instructions

Combine the coffee and water – and sugar if you want it sweet – in the pot and bring everything to a boil over low heat. Once it boils a layer of foam will form and if poured carefully it will stay on top – an indication of a perfect cup of coffee.

To get an even more frothy cup of coffee, some like to remove the first layer of foam from the first boil and place it in the cup with a spoon, then bring the coffee to a boil a second time, still boiling more foam which is carefully poured.

Turkish coffee cookies

When we think of coffee, we naturally think of the dessert to go with it. Cookies are always my favorite because they are easy to take out and share (I can’t make small batches and sharing is thoughtful!).

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon of Turkish coffee grounds
  • 60 grams of hazelnut or peanut butter
  • 50 grams of sugar
  • Vanilla extract
  • 5 grams of baking powder
  • 160 grams of flour
  • 2 tablespoons of molasses

For the icing

  • 50 grams of bitter chocolate
  • 2-3 tablespoons Turkish coffee grounds

Instructions

Put all the dough ingredients in a bowl and mix well until you get an evenly distributed dough. Spread it thinly and cut it as you wish. Place them evenly on a baking sheet and bake at 160 degrees Celsius (320 degrees Fahrenheit) for 15 to 20 minutes depending on their thickness and width. Let them cool. Melt chocolate and cover top of cookie. While the chocolate is still “wet”, sprinkle the cookie with coffee grounds. Let sit and enjoy!

Chocolate hummus with corn chips. (Photo Shutterstock)

Sweet Turkish Coffee Hummus

I could have gone with a chocolate and coffee cake, but it looked like something that had been done to death. So why not combine the classic Turkish drink with a classic Turkish meze?

There are many ways to taste hummus and this hearty variation is sure to be a nice addition to any table. Accompanied by fresh bread, croutons or lava, a soft flat bread, it is certainly a topic of conversation.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon of Turkish coffee grounds
  • 200 grams of cooked chickpeas
  • 1 tablespoon of cocoa
  • 2 tablespoons of honey
  • 2 tablespoons of tahini
  • 3 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons of water

Instructions

If you haven’t already, remove and discard the skin of the chickpeas, then put the skinless chickpeas in a blender. Add all other ingredients except olive oil and mix until smooth. Slowly stir in olive oil until the texture is just right. Depending on your personal taste, you can modify the recipe with more honey or add chocolate chips on top to make it more visually interesting.

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Deadly addition to Victorian kitchens which Mrs. Beeton deemed “harmless” https://villagemillbread.com/deadly-addition-to-victorian-kitchens-which-mrs-beeton-deemed-harmless/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 09:06:48 +0000 https://villagemillbread.com/deadly-addition-to-victorian-kitchens-which-mrs-beeton-deemed-harmless/ The adulterated food of the Victorians had fatal consequences that many were completely unaware of – but many took the advice of Ms Beeton, a popular English journalist, editor and writer at the time. Victorian bread contained deadly ingredients like chalk and iron sulfate ( Image: Getty) Staple foods like bread and milk can be […]]]>

The adulterated food of the Victorians had fatal consequences that many were completely unaware of – but many took the advice of Ms Beeton, a popular English journalist, editor and writer at the time.

Victorian bread contained deadly ingredients like chalk and iron sulfate

Staple foods like bread and milk can be considered safe these days, but it hasn’t always been so.

By the end of the 19th century, pantry staples such as bread and milk had become so popular that questionable techniques were devised to meet demand.

Inexpensive alternatives to replace the real ingredients have become the norm and for many consumers there have been fatal consequences.

In a YouTube video uploaded by Absolute History, these unsavory ingredients – including chalk, iron sulfate and plaster of paris – are unearthed.

Historian Kate Williams said: “One thing the Victorians loved was profit, and the way to make a profit was to use the cheapest ingredients and charge them a high price.


Video upload

Video unavailable

“Adulteration became very popular throughout the Victorian period, adding weight and increasing the profit margin.”

The new manufacturing process meant it was now a large company, completely depersonalizing the food chain.

For the Victorians, purchasing processed foods was seen as a positive, as it saved them time and meant they didn’t have to cook.

Dr Suzannah Lipscomb said: “Bread was particularly susceptible to adulteration, as a lot of things could be disguised in it.”

Alum was one of the more popular choices and was used as a bleach to add to inferior flours.

Limpscomb explained, “Alum is an aluminum-based compound, which is often found in detergents today.

“But when it’s hidden in bread, it often makes it appear whiter and it contains water to make the bread feel more substantial.”

Although the doses are low, when combined in different parts of the food, the toxicity levels really add up.






The dyes made the cakes more attractive but were dangerous if eaten

In the video we see three different breads, one is all natural and two of them contain plaster of paris, alum and other unwanted ingredients.

The Victorians always wanted the whitest bread to impress diners, which is why they always chose bread with the hidden toxic ingredients.

Chronic malnutrition and gastroenteritis became common, as a lot of bread was eaten daily, even by children.

Food historian Dr. Annie Gray said, “For a three-year-old, you would start with constipation and irregular bowel movements.

“If you are a three year old in a labor home with chronic diarrhea it would lead to death. “

Dr Suzannah Lipscomb continued, “Another reason to use adulterated foods was to make them more appealing and appealing.

You might not want a cup of tea either, as they were filled with iron filings, dust, used tea leaves, and black lead to make it look dark.

Sir Arthur Hill Hassall, a London-based doctor, has identified the use of adulterated foods in more than 2,500 products.

This led to the first exemption from the legislation in 1868, although the laws were not particularly strong or effective when they were first put in place.

For children at the time, the main source of calcium was milk. And that too had been tampered with after 20,000 samples had been tested.







Milk contained boric acid to prolong it
(

Picture:

Getty)

But that didn’t bother the Victorians, as many followed the advice of Ms Beeton, a popular English journalist, editor and writer at the time.

Lipscomb said: “According to his 1888 addition to his book on household management, the principle incorporated was borcaric acid.

“She concludes, ‘fortunately for the consumer, this is a harmless addition’.”

The acid extended the life of the milk and was also great for cleaning your bathroom.

If inhaled, it would cause irritation, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and could also affect the brain and liver.

Although many Victorians took Ms. Beeton at her word, according to Dr. Annie Gray, consuming milk and all of those other popular foods could unfortunately lead to death.

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Traditional Greek Tsoureki Sweet Bread Recipe https://villagemillbread.com/traditional-greek-tsoureki-sweet-bread-recipe/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 22:05:05 +0000 https://villagemillbread.com/traditional-greek-tsoureki-sweet-bread-recipe/ Tsoureki, or Greek sweet bread, can be eaten all year round, not just at Easter. Credit: Nostimo / Greek Reporter Tsoureki, or Greek sweet bread, is a favorite treat during the Christmas and Easter holidays in Greece. This traditional Tsoureki recipe includes all of the beloved holiday flavors the Greeks adore. Tsoureki (τσουρέκι in Greek) […]]]>
Tsoureki, or Greek sweet bread, can be eaten all year round, not just at Easter. Credit: Nostimo / Greek Reporter

Tsoureki, or Greek sweet bread, is a favorite treat during the Christmas and Easter holidays in Greece. This traditional Tsoureki recipe includes all of the beloved holiday flavors the Greeks adore.

Tsoureki (τσουρέκι in Greek) is the traditional sweet sourdough bread that the Greeks bake on Maundy Thursday every year and eat on Easter Sunday.

The name tsoureki comes from the Turkish word “corek” which means any bread made with leavened dough. There are many kinds of corek, both salty and sweet, which come in different shapes and sizes in different regions.

Grecian Delight supports Greece

Today, tsoureki has become a pastry shop all year round. It comes in different versions such as filled or covered with chocolate and nuts, and it can even be filled with pastry cream or dipped in syrup. Even eaten plain, this delicately sweet bread is delicious and refreshing after the long deprivations of Lent.

Tsoureki recipe

In a blender, beat 6 eggs with 110z / 310gr of sugar

-Mix for 8 minutes

Add: 2 teaspoons of Mahlepi and ½ teaspoon of prepared Mastiha

-Mix for 3 minutes

Add: 1 Lb of flour

-Mix for 3 minutes

Add 8 fl oz / 235 ml hot milk, 3 fl oz / 90 ml melted butter

-Mix for 2 minutes

Add 1 Lb of flour and 0.5oz / 15gr of dry yeast

– Mix for 10 minutes

– Let the dough rise for 1 hour

-Form into three thick strings, then braid together

-Leave to rise for 45 minutes.

-Place a little egg yolk diluted with water and decorate with slivered almonds

-Bake in preheated 320 ° F / 160 ° C oven for 30 to 40 minutes

Enjoy!


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Recipe: Sultana tea bread with marmalade https://villagemillbread.com/recipe-sultana-tea-bread-with-marmalade/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://villagemillbread.com/recipe-sultana-tea-bread-with-marmalade/ I’m not going to pretend it’s a Christmas cake, because it’s really very different. However, I like the idea of ​​a slice of fruit cake with a layer of butter for afternoon tea at this time of year. With marmalade and spices adding a hint of seasonal festivities. Apricot jam can also be used, if […]]]>

I’m not going to pretend it’s a Christmas cake, because it’s really very different.

However, I like the idea of ​​a slice of fruit cake with a layer of butter for afternoon tea at this time of year. With marmalade and spices adding a hint of seasonal festivities.

Apricot jam can also be used, if the marmalade is not popular or not available.

READ MORE:
* Recipe: Chai latte cake with condensed milk icing
* Recipes: treat yourself to the pastry this Christmas
* Recipe: Jordan Rondel’s Oat Cookies with Almond Butter and Marmalade

This is perfect if you like the idea of ​​a slice of fruit cake with a layer of butter for afternoon tea at this time of year.

Nicola Galloway

This is perfect if you like the idea of ​​a slice of fruit cake with a layer of butter for afternoon tea at this time of year.

SULTANA & MARMALADE TEA BREAD

Preparation time: 20 minutes + tea cooling time

Cooking time: 45-50 minutes

Makes 12 slices

Ingredients

cup of boiling water

1 English Breakfast tea bag (can use any tea here, the rooibos is delicious too)

1 cup (150g) raisins

3 eggs

¼ cup (50g) brown sugar

⅓ cup of olive oil or 80 g of melted butter

2 tablespoons of orange or grapefruit marmalade

1 ½ cup (225g) plain flour (can use gluten free)

1 ½ teaspoon of baking powder

1 teaspoon of mixed spices

pinch of salt

For the marmalade icing

1 tablespoon of marmalade

3 tablespoons of water

I'm not going to pretend it's a Christmas cake, because it's really very different.

Nicola Galloway

I’m not going to pretend it’s a Christmas cake, because it’s really very different.

Method

Brew the tea first. Put the boiling water and the tea bag in a bowl and let steep for 10 minutes. Remove the tea bag and add the raisins. Let stand to rehydrate for at least 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 180 ° C. Butter and line a 21cm x 11cm cake mold.

In a large bowl, whisk together eggs, sugar and melted oil / butter. Stir in the 2 tablespoons of the marmalade, along with the plump raisins and soaking liquid.

Sift over the dry ingredients and use a spatula to fold together until they are just combined. Pour batter into prepared pan and bake for 45 to 50 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. Cool in the pan for 5 minutes.

To make the frosting, combine marmalade and water in a small saucepan, bring to a boil for 1 minute. Brush frosting over hot bread, then remove from pan and transfer to a cooling rack.

Wrap the cooled bread in parchment paper and store in an airtight box. Consume within 5 days. Serve slices of tea bread for afternoon tea, spread with butter and extra marmalade.

Nicola Galloway is an award-winning food writer, cookbook author and cooking teacher.

homegrown-kitchen.co.nz


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Charlotte recipe with pears, bay leaf and cinnamon https://villagemillbread.com/charlotte-recipe-with-pears-bay-leaf-and-cinnamon/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://villagemillbread.com/charlotte-recipe-with-pears-bay-leaf-and-cinnamon/ Pear and bay leaf are a favorite combination; the warm clove notes of the bay leaf enhance the sweet scent notes of the pear. Keep your cool when you flip it – if you’ve lined the box well, your charlotte will be a triumph. Schedule Preparation time: 10 minutes Cooking time: 1h30 Serves Four Ingredients […]]]>

Pear and bay leaf are a favorite combination; the warm clove notes of the bay leaf enhance the sweet scent notes of the pear. Keep your cool when you flip it – if you’ve lined the box well, your charlotte will be a triumph.

Schedule

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Cooking time: 1h30

Serves

Four

Ingredients

  • 100 g salted butter, softened
  • 400 g cooking apples, peeled, seeded and cut into 1.5 cm dice
  • 400 g ripe pears, peeled, seeded and cut into 1.5 cm dice
  • 40 g light brown sugar
  • 2 bay leaves
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 x 800g sliced ​​white bread, crusts removed (you can blitz the crusts to use them as breadcrumbs for another time)
  • crème fraîche, double cream, ice cream or pastry cream, for serving

Method

  1. Melt 20 g of butter in a large saucepan, then add the apples and pears to the pan.
  2. Add the sugar, bay leaves and cinnamon and cook with a lid over low-moderate heat for about 10 minutes, until the apples begin to crumble. Remove from the heat and let cool aside.
  3. Preheat the oven to 180C / 160C hot air / thermostat 4.
  4. Using the remaining butter, lay out one side of all the bread slices and cut each slice in half to create triangles.
  5. Line a 900 g loaf pan with baking paper, then line the bottom and sides of the pan with the slices of bread, placing them buttered side down and overlapping them a bit, making sure there is no have no space. Reserve about a third of the buttered bread slices for the top.
  6. Remove the bay leaves from the pear-apple mixture, then fill the cake tin with the fruit. Top with reserved slices of bread, butter side up. Press firmly and try not to leave any space.
  7. Bake the charlotte for 45 minutes, until the top is crisp and golden.
  8. Remove from oven and let cool in pan for 5 to 10 minutes before returning to a serving platter. The charlotte must keep its shape.
  9. Serve hot with crème fraîche, crème fraîche, ice cream or pastry cream.


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Why the Vitamix E310 Blender is my favorite Christmas present https://villagemillbread.com/why-the-vitamix-e310-blender-is-my-favorite-christmas-present/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 20:15:45 +0000 https://villagemillbread.com/why-the-vitamix-e310-blender-is-my-favorite-christmas-present/ Last Christmas, after leaving a number of not-so-subtle clues for my family, I became the proud owner of a Vitamix E310 blender. Over the next few weeks, I experimented with my first mixes: hummus that tasted as good as anything you’d get in a Middle Eastern restaurant, creamy Nutella whipped with real hazelnuts, and silky […]]]>

Last Christmas, after leaving a number of not-so-subtle clues for my family, I became the proud owner of a Vitamix E310 blender. Over the next few weeks, I experimented with my first mixes: hummus that tasted as good as anything you’d get in a Middle Eastern restaurant, creamy Nutella whipped with real hazelnuts, and silky oat milk made. with just two ingredients.

As someone who had primarily lived on a take out and ready meal diet, I couldn’t believe how easy it was to use the Vitamix and, more importantly, how delicious everything was. One of my favorite recipes to make in the blender is a brownie batter that uses sweet potatoes, bananas, and almond butter in place of sugar and butter. The brownies are some of the sweetest you’ve ever tasted, and when I make them for friends and family, they’re always surprised when I reveal the healthy ingredients I’ve slipped in.

Since I got my Vitamix, I’ve raved about it so much that I’m pretty sure my friends are convinced that I secretly own shares in the company. When Select editor Morgan Greenwald got married this year, I even gifted him his own Vitamix blender.

While Vitamix blenders tend to be more expensive, I went with the brand’s relatively more affordable Explorian series E310 – it’s still more expensive than the average blender, but worth every penny. Few blenders are so powerful that you can just add a handful of vegetables and broth to them and make a hot, steaming soup a few minutes later. It’s also one of the most versatile blenders on the market: I’ve used my Vitamix for everything from making bread dough and ‘nice’ banana cream to preparing ingredients while cooking with it. the Pulse function.

With the help of my Vitamix, I ate more fresh fruits and vegetables and almost eliminated all processed foods from my diet. I have never felt better and saved a ton of money by eating more at home. If you had told me a year ago that a blender could change my life, I wouldn’t have believed it, but my Vitamix has been an invaluable investment in my health and overall well-being. What can I say ? It was love at first sight.

The Vitamix E310 comes with a powerful 2 HP motor that can handle more difficult mixes, depending on the brand. It has ten variable speeds as well as a pulse function for everything from purees to coarse chops. On the Vitamix website, the E310 blender has an average rating of 4.7 stars out of 2,210 reviews.

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